Archives for posts with tag: writing advice

I TALKED TO 150 WRITERS AND HERE’S THE BEST ADVICE THEY HAD
JOE FASSLER ON SEVEN OF THE MOST COMMON WRITING TIPS

via I Talked to 150 Writers and Here’s the Best Advice They Had | Literary Hub

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Marcia asked me to share this post with you all. It’s one I wrote recently for the Alliance of Independent Authors, on the need to occasionally revisit the pantser/plotter question as we prog…

Source: From Pantser to Plotter, or Maybe Plantser? #FabulousFridayGuestBlogger | The Write Stuff

Be disciplined. “The writer cannot write just when he feels like it or he won’t have anything to write with. Like the violin, he has to be constantly tuned and practiced.”On the other hand, when i…

Source: Sixteen Sweet Writing Tips from Madeleine L’Engle – Catherine Haustein

If you are always wondering about quoting something in your writing and the permission you might need, this blog post by Jane Friedman will help you.

If you need to request permissions from an author or publisher, here are general guidelines, plus a sample letter you can customize.

Source: A Basic Guide to Getting Permissions + Sample Permissions Letter

I’m sure we all know this (deep inside) but a reminder is always good. Thanks to Grammarly.

Learning a variety of writing skills isn’t as difficult as you may think. We’ve put together a list of steps to help you make dramatic…

Source: How to Improve Writing Skills in 15 Easy Steps | Grammarly

John Grisham’s suggestions on how to write popular fiction. Remember, they are suggestions.

A fantastic article about Chekhov, or rather a speech given to writers. Don’t miss the 6 principles that make for a good story.

Chekhov’s quest to inoculate himself against ennui offers lessons for writers working in our current climate of desensitization.

Source: Love in the Time of Numbness; or, Doctor Chekhov, Writer – The New Yorker

There are many lists of these words, but it’s always good to get a reminder.

Close your eyes. Imagine words as people in an office setting. The verbs scurry about, active and animated, getting things done. The adjectives and adverbs…

Source: 31 Words and Phrases You No Longer Need | Grammarly

A new initiative we’re going to be trying at Literary World Interviews. Would you be interested in having a psychiatrist’s opinion on relevant issues of your writing? Come over and have a look!

Lit World Interviews

Hi all:

I’d been having a chat with Ronovan about the possibility of writing something regular for the blog, apart from the reviews that I do as often as I can, and we’d discussed some ideas. As I’m a psychiatrist and had until recently been working in forensic psychiatry, I thought about the possibility of offering a serviceto authors who are considering either writing about mental disorders in their books, or would like a psychiatrist’s point of view or opinion on some conundrum they find themselves in (well, they find their writing in).

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The idea at the moment, if you think that could be of use, would be to create a form where you might have a bit more space than in the comments, to describe the issue (you could also share a short sample of the writing…) and then I would discuss it by way of a post…

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