Archives for posts with tag: Teagan Geneviene

Hi all:

As you know I love to write and read and I’ve been quite busy reading and reviewing of recent. Apart from sharing in the usual places, I also do reviews and share now in Literary World Interviews. And I realised I had not shared those here. So, as Christmas is coming, well, see what I’ve been reading and you might find something for a loved one (and of course, loving thyself is a great policy!).

For the writer you love, what better than:

Self-publishing Steps

Self-Publishing Steps to Successful Sales by Seumas Gallacher

Seumas Gallacher is a writer with a large on-line following. In this book, Mr. Gallacher shares his experiences of self-publishing. From his discovery that this was indeed a possibility, to now having thousands of books sold to his name.

This is not a detailed manual on how to format your book, or how to create you cover. There are plenty of posts, books, etc, that share that type of information. This book offers general advice on the topic, and it is concise and to the point. Moreover, it emphasises the author’s personal experience, that is, of course not fully replicable by anybody else. If you have not read Mr Gallacher’s posts in the various social media, you don’t know how personal his style is. His advice is sound and has to be adapted and transformed by every author. One of the points Mr Gallacher emphasises is the business aspect of writing. Although you might see it as an expression of your inner being or as a need to inform people of something, or as a deep felt vocation, if you plan on making a living out of writing, or trying to, you must approach it professionally as a business, the same you would any other. Of course, your reasons for writing could be others than to make money out of it. In that case you would be well advised to create your own definition of success and not worry too much about rankings or sales, although this book would still provide a useful general guide.

Personally, I found the book clear, easy to follow and a quick read. Mr Seumas’s personal style shines through. I particularly enjoyed the non-internet part of his experience that demonstrates the importance of making connections, knowing the area you work in, and not being shy. Try it. If they say no, you’re no further back that when you started, but if they say yes…the sky could be the limit.

I recommend this book to new authors and also to those who have a number of publications to their name. You might be reassured you’re doing the right things, you might wonder about a change of strategy, and you will enjoy the style of writing and discover plenty about the business. And also a few things about this great and generous author.

http://www.amazon.com/Self-Publishing-Steps-Successful-Seumas-Gallacher-ebook/dp/B00JBL6K80/

Atonement, Tennessee by Teagan Geneviene

Atonement, Tennessee by Teagan Geneviene

Atonement, Tennessee by Teagan Geneviene. Do you know who you really are?

In Atonement. Tennessee a few residents don’t and they make some interesting discoveries throughout the novel.

If there is such a thing as your “standard novel” and I’m not sure there is, Atonement, Tennessee is definitely not it. Although some aspects of the story might seem familiar to readers (we have a newcomer to a small and seemingly fairly quirky town, a catalogue of slightly odd characters, hidden and dark stories behind perfect surfaces…), others definitely will not. Although we spend most of the time in Ralda’s head (her given name is Esmeralda and that plays quite an important part in the book), we also see things from the point of view of Lilith, her cat, and that allows us to gain more knowledge than Ralda has, but from a peculiar viewpoint that means we are observes and what we see is unfiltered by either reason or prejudice.

Other novel and original aspects are its mixing of the everyday and the magical/paranormal. There are dogs barking, cats sneaking out, moving companies that keep getting delayed, but also strange and eerie mirrors, a cemetery that is part of the property and hides many secrets, attractive but strangely bizarre men, unknown magical birds, and fairly unusual dreams.

Ralda is self-reflective and we not only see things from her point of view (for the most part) but her internal dialogue works as a narrator who accompanies us. But how reliable a narrator is she? The many everyday worries that surround her (will the cat get out of the house? Will she finally get her possessions back? How much will it cost to repair the house?) keep pulling her attention away from the many strange and fantastic things that are also happening. She doubts herself, but she’s shown as dealing well with other people’s problems and being highly effective. When it comes to herself, though, things are more complicated and she does not want to accept that she can be at the centre of unknown powers and events. It is not so much that she’s trying to misguide us; it is that she does not even want to allow herself to think about certain things (like what she might feel for the male characters).

Although something mysterious happens early in the book (that seems connected to one of the objects), this is by no means the main mystery. Why Ralda is there and who she is are at the heart of the book and by the end we might have our suspicions, but like the protagonist, we lack information to come to any conclusions. We have the answer to some of our questions, but can only speculate about others. But this leaves room for a sequel and I hope the author will be working on it as you read this.

The writing style is engaging and accessible, there is enough description to fire the imagination without being overly detailed and doing all the work for the reader, and the chosen point of view offers fascinating psychological insights into the main character.

What did I love about the book? The setting, the fabulously strange house, the cemetery, Lilith, the sheriff (not as onedimensional as everybody thinks), the friendship between the four women, the locket, the bed, the dreams…It reminded me of Edgar Allan Poe but not as dark.

What didn’t I like? That there isn’t a second part to tell me more about the mysteries that are suggested but we don’t get to know enough of.

Who do I recommend it to? If you like spooky tales, old houses, mystery, cats, legends, magic and stories about women I’m sure you’ll enjoy it. Ah, let’s not forget unusual birds and cemeteries…Is there anybody not included?

I encourage the author to bring us part two very soon. We want to know more!

Here the book trailer, in case you want to get in the mood for the story.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=koggOn6vcDs#t=57

Amazon: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00HGSVA8A/

Create Space: http://www.amazon.com/dp/1481826948/

Barnes and Noble:

http://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/atonement-tennessee-teagan-geneviene/1117790203?ean=2940148918431

Some Luck by Jane Smiley

Some Luck by Jane Smiley

Some Luck by Jane Smiley. A novel about the things that really make life what it is.

There is something very attractive about settling down to read the story of a family and getting to know them for a lengthy period of time, as if they were family friends. In the case of Last Hundred Years Trilogy, of which Some Luck is the first novel, a hundred years, no less.

In an era when people don’t seem to have time for anything and everything must be shorter and faster today than it was yesterday, the promise of space and time to see characters and situations develop feels like a welcome luxury.

Jane Smiley’s new novel that starts with the kernel of a young family living in an Iowan farm, has been described as an epic and it is, not only for its large cast of characters (no big figures, no huge names, just people like you and me), but for its breadth, spread and ambition. Some Luck follows several generations of the same family (and they keep coming) through their lives and that of their country and the world. The novel is marvellously democratic, with no hierarchy of voices or experiences, and the same space is given to a toddler trying to understand the world around him and the functioning of his own body than to somebody drawing their last breath.

Readers get to know the many characters from inside, in a non-judgemental way, as you accompany them through their lives in their own heads, and you might like them and agree with them more or less, but you come to accept them as they are.

The book reminded me of a recent and wonderful movie Boyhood although the novel’s reach is greater but the feeling of peace and reflexivity you experience is similar.

The author’s ability to use brief but descriptive language, and combine it with extremely subjective, stream-of-consciousness passages, and quasi poetic everyday wisdom (and philosophy) creates a beautifully textured patchwork of a novel. If maybe the dimensions of the canvas are smaller, this could be the War and Peace of this generation.

This is a novel that moves at a sedate and calm pace, made of little moments and small steps; in summary, a novel about the things that really make life what it is. Extraordinary in its everydayness. I hope to meet the family (that has become mine as well) again very soon.

Paperback:  http://www.amazon.com/Some-Luck-novel-Jane-Smiley/dp/0307700313/

Kindle: http://www.amazon.com/Some-Luck-Jane-Smiley-ebook/dp/B00LB89SA8/

Dead drop by Jesse Miles

Dead drop by Jesse Miles

Dead Drop. A P.I. and Philosopher at home in L.A.

When I read the description of this novel in Net Galley (I obtained a free copy there) the premise sounded interesting. I enjoy mystery, suspense and crime thrillers. For me, the best are a combination of a gripping story and unforgettable characters. With regards to the story, it could be a fascinating and well described setting, or it might take place at an interesting historical moment, or in a peculiar background… And the characters…Real human beings with quirks, conflicts, lives, and voices. A P.I. who gets a job checking a possible case of embezzlement in a huge corporation (that as you can imagine quickly become far more complicated than that) and who also teaches Philosophy sounded promising on both counts.

Apart from all that, Dead Drop (the meaning of the name is explained in the novel) has elements also of the spy thriller. Jack Salvo, the detective, is in quite a few ways, your typical P.I. The novel is written in the first person and therefore we don’t get much on the way of other people’s point of view as to how Jack comes across to others. He seems popular with the women (although in some cases it is unclear if that might not be due to the attempts of the female characters at getting inside information from him), he knows about everything, he is well conversant with L.A. (I’ve never been there but to my untrained eye, the details seemed convincing), he is self-assured…and he teaches Philosophy and seems to enjoy it. But other than that little detail about him (and a very late brief discussion about his life with one of the female characters who becomes his love interest, Lily) I didn’t get the sense that I learned very much about the character or that he was much more than a collection of all his characteristics (that were neither offensive not particularly endearing, other than his interest in his teaching).

The plot is well developed and combines research, intrigue, action and mystery. Nobody is who they seem to be, and the story takes Jack from the corporate world, through veterans of the French foreign legion (and Philosophy experts to boot), bit actresses, luxury car garages, good old fashioned surveillance, breaking and entering, Swiss bank accounts, murder and bluff and double bluff.

The style of writing is clean, direct, easy to read, and fast-paced and fits in with the story. In summary I enjoyed the book but thought it could gain by developing the main character a bit more. Some of his reactions towards the end of the novel and his love story seem a bit sudden and not completely in keeping with the persona developed throughout the rest. As this is the first of a series of novels it might well be that the background will come more into play in later novels and it might allow the character to grow and become more multidimensional.

A solid story, a good and interesting read, just a notch below the unmissable category.

 http://www.amazon.com/Dead-Drop-Jesse-Miles-ebook/dp/B00NMO1S9I/

I hope you find something you, or someone you know, might fancy, but don’t worry, I have more to come. Also do check my previous recommendations, new books, and I’ll be reminding you of other suggestions on Fridays posts coming up to Christmas. 

Ah, and is that time of the year when we fancy something a bit new, so I decided to change the cover of my YA/NA novella ‘Twin Evils?‘ the story of two twins and their friend where things might not be exactly as they seem. And to celebrate the new cover it’s only $0.99.

See what you think!

Twin Evils? by Olga Núñez Miret

Twin Evils? by Olga Núñez Miret

Thanks to all the writers featured for their books, thanks to you all for reading, and you know, like, share, comment and of course CLICK!

Advertisements

Hi all:

It’s Friday and as you know I like to bring you guest authors and/or new books in this spot. For the last few weeks I’ve brought you the books, and a bit of information, about some of the blogger authors I follow, as I suddenly realised that after exchanging comments on everything (from recipes, to travelling, diets, healthy lifestyle, funny videos, mediums and magic) with them, I had never brought them to my blog and talked about their books. And it was about time.

Today I bring  you Teagan R. Geneviene. I discovered her wonderful writing blog, where readers make suggestions of ingredients, and with her new serial, also magic elements, for each week’s installment, and Teagan delights us with a new chapter every week. Her stories are full of wonderful characters, wit, fun, imagination, and she always finds fabulous illustrations.

We were recently talking about dreams, and what important role they can play both in life and in creativity, and from there came this interview. Here I leave you with Teagan (ah, and the images provided are also her choice!):

Teagan Geneviene

Teagan Geneviene

 

“Deep into that darkness peering, long I stood there, wondering, fearing, doubting, dreaming dreams no mortal ever dared to dream before…”  Edgar Allan Poe

Learn to Dream

If we tried to describe Teagan’s background, the things that made her who she is, it would take much more than an interview.  She joked that the psychiatrist in me could write volumes about it.  Actually, Teagan has made many new beginnings in her life – new volumes (not just new chapters).

“Back then a friend looked at me in amazement and said ‘You don’t mind shaking things up, do you?’  More than 15 years later, she still lives in the same place and works at the same job. I sincerely admire her stability.  But that wasn’t in the cards for me.”

One of those new volumes began when she changed careers.  After a divorce Teagan left low-paying low-level office jobs to become a technical editor. She started at the bottom, earning a Bachelor of Science degree related to information technology (IT).  She wanted a solid foundation to launch her career in technical writing and editing.  Over the years, she carefully plotted that new profession, making sacrifices that most would not consider, and became a successful and well respected technical editor and writer.

Her most recent “volume” was relocating to the east coast of the USA.  Before she moved to her nation’s capital, Washington, DC, her work focused on the combination of IT and healthcare.  However, now her 9 to 5 job has more of an analytical and organizational application.

“It was a way to keep a roof over my head, while still working with what I enjoy most – words.”

During all those years she used her spare time to write fantasy stories and novels, honing her skills as a completely different sort of writer and editor.

Dare to Dream

“A friend in New Mexico once shook her head and said, ‘You’re like an onion. Every time I think I know who you are, I see another new layer!’  I took it as a big compliment.”

Teagan suggested that we give this interview a theme, that of dreams.

I used to be very attuned to all manner of metaphysical things, particularly dreams. However, since I’ve been in DC, I’ve felt very disconnected from all that.

I asked Teagan why that would be, and she described one idea about how each person has different physical reactions to various things. She used her egg allergy as an example. One person might enjoy eggs as a healthful food.  Another might have a problem with the cholesterol, while another might have a horrible allergic reaction.

“Similarly, maybe locations can have different effects on various people.  You might find a place stimulated your interest in everything around you. Another person might feel overwhelmed while in that location, while another feels spiritually disconnected.  That kind of thing.  Sorry.  I enjoy going down these “What If” tangents. We can go back to “dreams” now.”

Atonement, Tennessee by Teagan Geneviene

Atonement, Tennessee by Teagan Geneviene

Teagan told me she wishes to reconnect with that aspect of herself, — with dreams and interpreting them, and with what she callsall sorts of new-agey things.”  Dreams figure into much of Teagan’s writing.  Her debut novel, Atonement, Tennessee, has a couple of scenes where dreams play an important part.  There is even a chapter called “Bras Bed Dreams,” with an antique bed that causes people to have dreams of the past or even past lives.

Brass bed 1

It’s not surprising to me that Teagan dreams of being able to make a living from her novels.  I finally “escaped from psychiatry” so I understand that wish and how hard it is to make it real.

“The future belongs to those who believe in the beauty of their dreams…” Eleanor Roosevelt

Writing Dreams

If you could see how animated Teagan gets when she talks about writing, you’d know it really is her dream.  I asked if she ever dreams her imaginative stories, and she didn’t really think so.  However, she often visualizes them and the characters, rather like a daydream.

“All our dreams can come true, if we have the courage to pursue them…”  Walt Disney

She has a few works in progress, if no time to devote to them.  However, she does find time each week to write an episode of the interactive culinary mystery serial that is featured on her blog, Teagan’s Books.  It’s a 1920’s story, and a big departure from her novels.

Old House_dreamstime_xs_22975594

“I’ve been influenced by several authors, mostly fantasy writers.  However, my debut novel — ‘Atonement, Tennessee’ is different from the quest-type fantasy (as I like to call it) that I usually write.  I call Atonement an urban fantasy with a side order of mystery.  I would never compare my work to someone as talented and successful as Charlaine Harris, but if you like her Sookie Stackhouse books, I think you would like my ‘Atonement’ stories.

Teagan always aspires to work on book-two in the Atonement series, and kicks herself for not managing to do more on it.  Right now it looks like the only way she will be able to finish “Atonement in Bloom” this year is to take a sabbatical from the blog serial.

Mirror

 

Some of the magical artifacts that caused trouble in the first book will be back, including that bras bed I mentioned, and the mirror of truth and justice.  Many of the characters will return, including a “device” she used in book-1 — the cat.  The story is written in first person. So when Teagan needs to tell the reader about something the heroine can’t see, she writes that scene from the point of view of Lilith, the calico cat.

??????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????

“The supernatural parts of Atonement are loosely inspired by the ancient myth of Gwydion fab Don.  I bring in additional Celtic myths for the sequel and with it new trouble-making characters.”

So there you have it — the latest “volume” in the story of Teagan and a little about her books too.

Thanks so much to Teagan for her kindness and her great interview and images, thanks to you for reading, and you know what I always say, if you’ve enjoyed it, don’t forget to like, share, comment, and CLICK!

Dog-Cat-Cooking_dreamstime_s_24255835

 

Hi all:

I decided I should share some of the blogs I follow and read regularly (as much as I can) for a couple of reasons. One is because I’m a bit in flux at the moment and as I wasn’t sure how much new content I could provide, I thought it was only fair to share the content of some of the blogs I come back to regularly so you would have  a chance to go exploring. Another reason is that every now and then I get offered some award for blogging, and as I decided some time ago to concentrate on the writing, I don’t follow through. A fellow blogger (more about her later) when she gets offered and award, she shares some of the blogs she follows and finds inspiring, and I thought that was a very good idea. So, thank you Teagan!

I follow many more blogs and I read as many as I can, but I thought I’d leave you a selection of a few (more next week) by topic. I hope this would become a feature and I’ll bring you updates regularly.

Image courtesy of Dominic Harness / FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Image courtesy of Dominic Harness / FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Today I thought I’d share some of the blogs that offer good information on all aspects of writing, and some that are by writers who talk about their trade, but also about their lives and other equally (or to my mind sometimes much more) fascinating themes.

Seumas Gallacher:

http://seumasgallacher.com/

This Scotsman now living in warmer and drier climates, has a unique style of interaction and loves social networking (you have to read him to know what I mean. I won’t try and imitate his style). He is amusing, provides useful information, and his approach proves that being unique and genial are strong assets in this world of blandness and copycats. Go on and check him out!

Daily Writing Tips (Maeve Maddox):

http://www.dailywritingtips.com/

Not being a native English speaker, I’m always trying to check my language and looking for tips, suggestions and good explanations. Maeve’s post never fail to teach me something new, and they’re always well thought and researched. A great resource!

Communicate Resources for Writers (Cate Artios)

http://cateartios.wordpress.com/

I know Cate through one of the writers’ groups I belong too, and we belong to the same Tribe in Triberr, so we share each other posts regularly. I enjoy the posts of all of my colleagues, but I’ve found Cate’s posts again a great resource and a mine of information. Cate creates her own posts and she’s always prompt to reblog and share posts she thinks will help others. Thanks Cate!

Sandy Appleyard (Author of hopeful memoirs and fiction)

http://www.sandyappleyard.com/

I’ve been following Sandy’s post for a while. She always manages to discover a new way to promote your books and increase visibility, and she’s always generous in passing the information on and offering help if you have difficulties. Now I’ve joined a group she’s created in Facebook and I’m sure there’s plenty more learning to come!

The Creative Penn (Joanna Penn):

http://www.thecreativepenn.com/

Joanna Penn and ‘The Creative Penn’ are well-known for their efforts in informing writers about resources, technology, programmes, training opportunities, and bringing innovators to her blog. I can’t imagine there are many people who haven’t come across her yet, but just in case somebody has been asleep for a while, I thought I’d mention her.

Teagan’s Books (Teagan Geneviene):

http://teagansbooks.wordpress.com/

Teagan’s blog, like many blogs of writers (I guess including mine) are a bit of a mix. Sometimes we all like to feel that it is our blog and therefore we’ll write about what we like, and if somebody likes it, all the better. But what I love about Teagan’s Books is the writing. Teagan is committed to writing a new piece (instalment) every week, and she takes to writing challenges like duck to water. I only discovered Teagan recently (although it feels as if we were close friends already) but I’m glued to her series of the three ingredients, where she’s writing a story set in the 1920s incorporating 3 food ingredients every week (these are provided by friends and other bloggers). She’s done other writing assignments before and I hope to be able to catch up with them soon. And don’t miss the care she takes in finding great period images for her posts (and of course, the recipes)! Go Teagan!

The next three blogs are by writers about writing also, but to me they have a bit of a more personal style.

Laurie Smith’s blog:

http://laurie27wsmith.wordpress.com/

Laurie Smith is a man who seems to have lived many lives in one. I love his Army series, that includes pictures of the period (oh, the pink tank!), his Wednesday offerings (usually great pictures and kangaroos and wallabies for good measure), and recently he’s talking about his experiences as a medium. If you want variety, Laurie is your man!

Barsetshire Diaries (David Prosser):

http://barsetshirediaries.wordpress.com/

Lord David Prosser (as his close friends call him), follows a diary style for his blogs. He writes his daily happenings and posts on a Sunday. Over time I’ve become fond of Reuben (grandchildren always a plus, and he’s gorgeous), his fishes, his brother (what time will he get up today?), the people at the eateries he visits, and the never ending stream of e-mails and posts that keep him glued to his computer (unfortunately my posts are part of the problem). He’s recently published a children’s book with illustrations and he’s a generous and thoughtful blogger, who will add mid-week posts if some good cause comes his way. He’s also become part of my family of bloggers.

Ailsa Abraham:

http://ailsaabraham.com/

I’d love to remember who alerted me to Ailsa’s posts (I think it might have been Seumas, who’s always prompt at reblogging posts he enjoys) but I read one where she was talking about trying to cope with her stroke in such a humorous way that I kept telling everybody I met about it. Ailsa is a writer, now living in France, and she has a fantastic sense of humour. She’s trying her hand at poetry and I cannot recommend her blog enough. Go and visit! You’ll feel better for it!

Thanks to all the bloggers for participating (without their knowledge but I hope they won’t mind), thank you for reading, I hope you’ve enjoyed it, and if you have, please like, share, comment, and especially CLICK and FOLLOW!

Living in the Gap

“Ruffled feathers and endless squawking over a minor difficulty is typical of a crow’s life. I lean back on the counter and realize that could be my line….”

Opinión y actualidad

Opinión sobre noticias y asuntos de actualidad

Los escritos de Héctor Browne

Blog (algo literario y algo viejo) de un Licenciado en Letras, diplomado en edición, y Profesor de Lenguaje.

Priscilla Bettis, Author

The making of a horror novelist.

%d bloggers like this: